News Releases

Posted on: September 2, 2016

16-055 Campfires now allowed at most state parks in Western Washington

Individual parks may still have fire restrictions, depending on conditions

OLYMPIA – Sept.  2, 2016 – The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission is easing restrictions on campfires for parks in western Washington and ocean beaches in the Seashore Conservation Area, effective immediately. Western Washington is considered the region west of the crest of the Cascade Mountain range.

People may now use wood and charcoal in approved state park fire pits only. Propane or gas cook stoves and gas-powered fire pits have been allowed in most parks during the campfire ban.

Park managers have the discretion to restrict campfires in these campgrounds based on their assessment of conditions, which may change quickly. State Parks asks the public to understand that any park-specific restrictions are made to ensure visitor safety and mitigate risk of wildfires. Park managers may require smaller fires than are normally acceptable.

To find out the campfire restrictions for state parks in western Washington, download the burn ban for:

Washington State Parks urges campers to be vigilant, despite the wet weather, and to  douse campfires until they feel cool to the touch before leaving the campground.

The easing of the burn ban follows the Sept. 1 announcement by the Commissioner of Public Lands and the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) that adjusted the current statewide burn ban allowing for recreational campfires in western Washington. That agency has fire protection responsibility for nearly 13 million acres statewide, including most state parks.

The burn ban continues for state parks in Eastern Washington, which are still at risk for wildfires due to dry conditions.

The public is encouraged to visit the individual state parks web pages to learn more about any specific campfire restrictions: http://parks.state.wa.us/281/Parks

Seashore Conservation Area

Washington State Parks manages the Washington State Seashore Conservation Area (SCA), which extends along most of Washington’s outer coastline, excluding Tribal Reservation and National Park lands. The SCA includes the areas between Cape Disappointment and Leadbetter Point; between Toke Point and the South jetty on Point Chehalis; and between Damon Point and Moclips; and occupying the area between the line of ordinary high tide and the line of extreme low tide.




About Washington State Parks

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission manages more than 100 state parks and properties totaling approximately 120,000 acres. The Commission provides a variety of recreation opportunities for citizens and provides stewardship protection for a diverse array of natural, cultural and historic resources. State Parks’ statewide programs include long-distance trails, boating safety and winter recreation.

Follow Washington State Parks:

Share your favorite state park adventure on the State Parks’ blog site at www.AdventureAwaits.com.

Support state parks by purchasing your annual Discover Pass today, and enjoy a whole year of outdoor fun on Washington’s beautiful state-managed recreation lands. For more information, visit www.discoverpass.wa.gov.

MEDIA CONTACTS:      

Toni Droscher, (360) 902-8604
Srey Ryser, (360) 902-8626
Debbie Fant, (360) 902-8635 


Wash. Telecommunications Relay Service: (800) 833-6388

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