News Releases

Posted on: July 8, 2016

16-041 New Old Time Chautauqua coming to Southeastern Washington

Events take place at Fields Spring and Lewis & Clark Trail state parks
and local communities


OLYMPIA – July 8, 2016 – The New Old Time Chautauqua (NOTC) and Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission are teaming up to bring family fun, educational experiences, food and entertainment to two southeast Washington state parks—Fields Spring and Lewis and Clark Trail—and the town of Dayton in July.


The NOTC is America’s only traveling or circuit Chautauqua. This summer, the NOTC has joined with State Parks to help renew ties between Washington’s beautiful park system and nearby communities by hosting Chautauquas at seven state parks.

The first stop on the NOTC-State Parks tour will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Saturday, July 16, at Fields Spring State Park, 992 Park Rd., Anatone. (Directions: https://goo.gl/maps/JGbTfcDx35P2)

The next stop is from 4 to 8 p.m., Monday, July 18, at Lewis and Clark Trail State Park, 36149 Hwy 12, Dayton. (Directions: https://goo.gl/maps/ohC8dQozrdR2) The following day, Tuesday, July 19, activities will take place from noon to 3:30 p.m. in downtown Dayton and at Dayton High School.

Fields Spring State Park schedule

Saturday, July 16

Free workshops: 4 to 6 p.m.

Hour-long workshops led by local citizens include: a walking tour and park history with Shaun Bristol; regional flora and fauna with master gardener Ann Freeman; Washington State University’s Raptor Club with some of its rescued birds of prey; and arts and crafts using objects found in the park. In addition, the NOTC will teach juggling, acrobatics and clowning.


Community Potluck: 6 to 8 p.m.

Local community members and visitors are invited to bring to dish and share. Musical entertainment will be provided by the NOTC’s 25-piece band.

On July 14, the NOTC and State Parks will visit the Nez Perce Tribe in Lapwai, Idaho. Activities there will include community service projects, a parade, workshops, a potluck supper and a big performance, ending with a swing dance at the Pi-Nee-Waus Community Center.


Lewis and Clark State Park Trail schedule

Monday, July 18

Free workshops: 4 to 6 p.m.

  • Eagle Lady of Florida: Doris Mager, former director of Raptor Research and Education at the Florida Conservation Foundation, will share the skills of her Great Horned Owl as well as information about the research group, Save Our American Raptors (SOAR).
  • Flora & Fauna: Gary Lentz, historian and former park manager of Lewis & Clark Trail State Park, will lead a tour of the park while dressed in period costume. Learn about the plants and animals in the park and the history of local Native American Tribes and the Lewis & Clark Corps of Discovery.
  • Forest Fire Prevention: How to build a safe campfire.
  • Walk on the Wild Side: Animal biologist Alyssa Winkler from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife will show the hides, fur, skulls, bones and antlers of local animals and talk about their habitats.
  • Nature Arts and Crafts: Learn to make environmentally friendly bird feeders and other children’s nature crafts.
  • Juggling, Acrobatics and Clowning workshops presented by the New Old Time Chautauqua.


Community potluck: 6 to 8 p.m.

Local community members and visitors are invited to bring a dish to share. Musical entertainment will be provided by the NOTC’s 25-piece band.

Town of Dayton schedule

Tuesday, July 19

The Big Parade: Noon to 12:30 p.m.

Downtown Dayton, ending at Pietrzycki City Park.

Members of the community and local organizations will join the NOTC’s marching band for a grand parade through town. The parade includes NOTC jugglers, clowns, stilt walkers, local youth dressed up in costumes, local musicians and some surprise guests.

Free 45-minute workshops: 12:30 to 3:30 p.m.

The NOTC will offer more than two dozen 25 workshops on everything from learning how to juggle, face paint, make a mask and fold a fitted sheet, to workshops on history and health. The Dayton community will also provide workshops on:

  • Heart and Lung Health: Tom Anderson of the Cardiopulmonary Department at the Columbia County Health System will give a presentation on the health of the human heart and lungs using a pig lung as a visual aid.
  • Old-Time Dance: Daniel Clark of the Fort Walla Walla Museum Living History Company will teach old-time dances.
  • Theater Techniques: Instructors and participants of Shakespeare Walla Walla’s Theater Summer Camp will offer a workshop on theatrical performance techniques.

In addition to the above tour stops, the NOTC and State Parks have scheduled five more events at the following state parks and communities:

  • July 22 – 23
    Fort Simcoe State Park, White Swan | Toppenish

  • July 25 - 26
    Bogachiel State Park | Forks

  • July 29 - 30
    Larrabee State Park, Bellingham | Mount Vernon

  • Aug. 1 – 2
    Conconully State Park, Conconully | Tonasket

  • Aug. 5 - 6
    Curlew Lake State Park | Republic

For more information about the NOTC-State Parks summer tour, contact Paul Magid, NOTC organizer, (917) 754-2191, paulmagid@gmail.com or Debbie Fant, State Parks Folk and Traditional Arts Coordinator, (360) 902-8635, deborah.fant@parks.wa.gov.

For more details about the 2016 New Old Time Chautauqua events, history and biographies of performers and presenters, visit: http://www.chautauqua.org/

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About New Old Time Chautauqua

NOTC is a not-for-profit 501(c)3 organization of 60-plus volunteer performers, educators and staff whose mission is to travel throughout the Greater Northwest to small towns and Native Nations to promote community through education, entertainment and laughter. The NOTC was founded in 1981 by the Flying Karamazov Brothers and Dr. Patch Adams. For the last 35 years, the NOTC has brought the Chautauqua concept to towns in Washington, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Northern California, British Columbia and Alaska. The NOTC is part of great Chautauqua movement that began in 1874 and continues on to this day. 

About Washington State Parks

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission manages more than 100 state parks and properties totaling approximately 120,000 acres. The Commission provides a variety of recreation opportunities for citizens and provides stewardship protection for a diverse array of natural, cultural and historic resources. State Parks’ statewide programs include long-distance trails, boating safety and winter recreation.

Follow Washington State Parks:

Share your favorite state park adventure on the State Parks’ blog site at www.AdventureAwaits.com.

Support state parks by purchasing your annual Discover Pass today, and enjoy a whole year of outdoor fun on Washington’s beautiful state-managed recreation lands. For more information, visit www.discoverpass.wa.gov.

MEDIA CONTACTS:                         

Paul Magid, NOTC, (917) 754-2191
Debbie Fant, (360) 902-8635
Toni Droscher (360) 902-8604


Wash. Telecommunications Relay Service:
(800) 833-6388


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