Squak Mountain State Park

Lace up your sneakers or hiking boots, and chart a course for Squak Mountain State Park. 

Just a few minutes east of Seattle, Squak Mountain has miles of walking and horse trails for people of all abilities. 

Meander through the forest past bubbling creeks, mossy rocks and trees dripping with lichen. Ramble down the Bullitt Fireplace Trail to see the impressive remains of the 1952 Bullitt House’s stone fireplace. 

Training for bigger treks? Tag the summit of Squak Mountain at 2,024 feet, and treat yourself to a peek-a-boo view of Seattle. If not for that view, you might forget you are close to a city. 

The Seattle cardio craze is evident at this park; on late spring evenings and Friday afternoons Squak Mountain plays host to the eastside running and power-walk crowd. Why not join them? Fitness fans, nature lovers and visitors to the Emerald City will find plenty to do here, and neighboring Issaquah provides scores of eateries for a post-workout meal. 

Park features


Squak Mountain State Park is a 1,592-acre day-use park just outside of Issaquah and a 15-minute drive from Seattle. Fires are not permitted at any time.
  1. Activities
  2. History
  3. Maps

ADA amenities/facilities


  • Restroom
  • Hiking trail

Picnic & day-use facilities

The park offers six unsheltered picnic tables at the trailhead and one at the Bullitt fireplace site. All are available on a first-come, first-served basis. There is a vault toilet at the trailhead and a horse-loading ramp that is accessible to people with disabilities. There is no water available at Squak Mountain.

Activities


Trails


  • 13 miles of hiking trails
  • 6 miles of horse trails

Other activities


  • Bird watching
  • Interpretive activities
  • Wildlife viewing

Interpretive opportunities


The park features a self-guided interpretive walk along the 0.3-mile Pretzel Tree Trail adjacent to the main trailhead. The trail illustrates the adventures of Field Mouse as he meets local forest creatures and discovers their importance in the ecosystem on his search for the Pretzel Tree.