Steptoe Butte & Steptoe Battlefield State Parks

Classification and Management Planning

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Washington State Parks is beginning a planning process for Steptoe Butte State Park and Steptoe Battlefield State Park Heritage Sites. State Parks prepares land use plans through an agency-wide planning system called Classification and Management Planning or CAMP.  CAMP is a multi-staged, public participation-based planning process for individual parks that culminates with adoption of park land classifications, a long-term park boundary, and a park management plan.  The combination of these deliverables constitutes a land use plan.  The CAMP process typically takes ten to fifteen months to complete

Steptoe Butte State Park

Steptoe Butte is a 150-acre day-use park located high above the Palouse Hills on the southeastern edge of Washington, Steptoe Butte offers unparalleled views of a truly unique landscape. The warm quartzite bluff stands out against soft hills of green and mauve, an occasional barn dotting the landscape. Colors seem to shift and change in the light.  The butte contains some of the oldest rock in the Pacific Northwest, and it marks the border of the original North American Continent.   Steptoe has, over time, been a wagon road, a hotel site and an observatory location. In addition to inspiring vistas, the 3,612-foot summit displays several interpretive panels that pay homage to its distinctive geology.

Steptoe Battlefield State Park

Steptoe Battlefield State Park Heritage Site is a four-acre day-use park in Rosalia. The site commemorates a battle between U.S. Army forces led by Colonel Edward Steptoe and several Native American tribes from eastern Washington that occurred in 1858.

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Contact Us

Randy Kline
Project Lead
Email
P.O. Box 42650
Olympia, WA 98504
Ph:  (360) 902-8632
Fx:  (360) 586-0207 

Stage One - Identify issues and concerns


The purpose of this stage is to understand what is important to the park community, what to change or save in the state park. This helps get a sense of the range and type of issues that need to be considered through the planning process.



Stage Two – Exploring alternative approaches


At this stage, the planning team suggests potential alternative approaches to address the various issues and concerns raised by people in stage one. No preferred alternative is established; rather this is an opportunity to understand the range of possibilities.


Stage Two Documents

Stage Three – Preparing preliminary recommendations

The best ideas from the alternative approaches developed in stage two are combined into a preliminary plan in this stage. The plan includes recommendations for use and development of land, changes to property boundaries and ways to address issues raised during the planning process. Another important document completed at this stage is the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) checklist that describes environmental impacts of the recommendations.

Stage Three Documents

Stage Four – Preparing final recommendations

At stage four, final adjustments are made to recommendations and submitted to the seven-member Parks and Recreation Commission for approval. The public is encouraged to attend the Commission meeting and provide testimony or to provide written comment.

Stage Four Documents